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Bolton-le-Moors One-Place Study

Lancashire

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Bolton-le-Moors

This study takes in the two areas of Bolton-le-Moors, Great Bolton and Little Bolton and their corresponding Townships.

The ancient parish of Bolton,was made up of two very distinct towns (Great Bolton and Little Bolton) that were separated by the River Croal which commences in Horwich, at Red Moss near to the Macron Football Stadium and then meanders down into the town of Bolton by following the course of the Bolton-Preston railway line, then goes underground to resurface near the Parish Church then goes on to eventually to join up with the River Irwell.

The lands within this ancient parish were held in the 12th century by three distinct tenures. With the exception of the Pilkington family of Rivington, the Bradshaws of Bradshaw and the Orells of Turton, the local landowners of the medieval period where either non-resident or not known.




Charles Cosworth Harman

Anglezark, Belmont, Blackrod, Bradshaw, Chapletown, Darcy Lever, Edgeworth, Entwistle, Farnworth, Great Bolton, Great Lever, Harwood, Horwich, Little Bolton,

Little Lever, Longworth, Lostock, Quarlton, Rivington, Rumworth, Sharples,

Tonge-with-Haulgh, Turton and Westhoughton

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2013

Active

10 Jul 2015

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Online


Online

Online


Online

Online


Online


Online


Online


Online

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Online

To do

1837


1837

1813

Online

To do

To do


To do

Onlinet


To do

To do


Offline


Offline


None found

To do


None found

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Yes

This study takes a look at the various townships that comprised Bolton-Le-Moors by studying their place in history, the economic and political issues of the time, the Transport, Culture and Society, Notable People, the owners, householders, workers, the manor houses and their usage, population, religion including churches and chapelries and various hamlets and much more.




185,397

The name Bolton is derived from the Old English bothl-tun and its first recorded use was in the form of Boelton dating from 1185. It was recorded as Bothelton in 1212, Botelton 1257, Boulton 1288 and Bolton after 1307. The towns motto of Supera Moras means "overcome difficulties" but translates literally as "Bolton on the moors". There is evidence of human existance on the moors around Bolton from early Bronze Age.



charlescosworth.harman

@ntlworld.com

In 1067 Great Bolton belonged to Roger de Poiter and after 1100 to Roger de Meresheys, later to the Pilkington family who forfeited it in the Civil War and then to the Stanley's who became Earls of Derby.



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